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Netherlands

Risk Ratings  
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    LOW MEDICAL RISK for Netherlands
    LOW TRAVEL RISK for Netherlands


COVID-19 Impact

COVID-19 virus imageCOVID-19 Impact Rating (Travel): High -

Inbound travel significantly restricted for most travellers.

Only citizens and those who meet certain criteria for exemption  may enter. Mandatory testing and quarantine in designated facilities may apply.

COVID-19 virus imageCOVID-19 Impact Rating (Domestic Operations): Low -

COVID-related precautions and restrictions causing some inconvenience to business operations. Most businesses are operating.

Both essential and non-essential businesses are operating, though outbreaks may impact medical and/or logistic factors  and cause disruption, often at short notice. Pre-existing security risks likely to be exacerbated by COVID-19-related political and socio-economic concerns in the near/medium term, though these disruptions will not affect the stability of the overall security environment. Elective surgery may not be accessible at times and VERY HIGH and HIGH Medical Risk Rated countries will be under pressure. Basic elements of BCPs – such as reduced or staggered staffing, social distancing, limited face to face interaction – may be active, with clear escalation and de-escalation triggers as well as mitigation measures.

RestrictionsInboundSummary
• Are there any border restrictions? No
• Are there any entry restrictions? Yes
• Are there any testing requirements? Yes
• Are there any quarantine requirements? Yes
• Are there any vaccine requirements? No
• Are there any separate transit restrictions? Yes
• Is COVID-19-related documentation required? Yes
Are there any other restrictions? Yes
(Until further notice)
Entry restrictions
A) Inbound travel for European nationals
European nationals or residents are able to enter the Netherlands.

B) Inbound travel for 'third country' nationals
The Netherlands allows unrestricted entry for residents of Australia, China (including Hong Kong and Macao (both China SAR)), New Zealand, Rwanda, Singapore, South Korea and Thailand. Nationals of other countries may enter if they are employed in certain sectors, coming for study purposes or have a compelling reason to visit their family.

While the Netherlands no longer has an entry ban in place, an EU entry ban remains in force. Those entering from the EU entry ban are able to enter the Netherlands.

Full details on exemptions are available at: https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/visiting-the-netherlands-from-abroad/exemptions-to-the-entry-ban
(Until further notice)
Testing requirements

A) Who needs to test?
All travellers over 13 years of age arriving in the Netherlands by aircraft, ship, car, motorcycle, train or coach from a high-risk area must get tested for COVID-19. Only travellers coming from safe countries are exempt from testing.

The latest list of safe countries can be found here: https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/visiting-the-netherlands-from-abroad/eu-list-of-safe-countries

B) Type of test and number of hours
The test must be a PCR, LAMP or TMA and it must have been taken within 72 hours of arrival.

Travellers arriving from a virus-variant country have two options for testing:
- A negative PCR test taken within 24 hours before departure
- A negative PCR test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival in the Netherlands AND a rapid antigen test taken within 24 hours of boarding.

The following countries are classified as virus-variant: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, India, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay, Venezuela and South Africa. The list is reviewed periodically and can be found here: https://www.rijksoverheid.nl/onderwerpen/coronavirus-covid-19/reizen-en-vakantie/verplichte-negatieve-covid-19-testuitslagen/soorten-negatieve-testuitslagen

C) What information needs to be included with the test result?

For the PCR test:
The negative test result must be in Dutch, English, French, German, Italian, Portuguese or Spanish. A translation of the test result will be accepted provided the translation bears the original signature or stamp of the doctor or institute that conducted the test. The document must include the following information:
• Type of test: the test used must be a molecular PCR test for the diagnosis of active SARS-CoV-2 infection (COVID-19). No other type of test, including a rapid test, is valid
• Test result: the test result must be negative (or ‘not detected’)
• Your given name and surname as stated in your passport
• Date and time you were tested: the test sample must have been collected no more than 72 hours prior to arrival in the Netherlands
• Name and contact information of the institute or laboratory that conducted the test

For the rapid test:
The negative test result must be in Dutch, English, French, German, Italian, Portuguese or Spanish. A translation of the test result will be accepted provided the translation bears the original signature or stamp of the doctor or institute that conducted the test. The document must include the following information:
• Type of test: the test used must be a rapid test (antigen or LAMP test) or PCR test for the diagnosis of active SARS-CoV-2 infection (COVID-19)
• Test result: the test result must be negative (or ‘not detected’) for SARS-CoV-2
• Your given name and surname as stated in your passport
• Date and time of test: for passengers, the test sample must have been collected no more than four hours prior to boarding the aircraft or ferry. For transport workers travelling by ferry, the test sample must have been collected no more than 24 hours prior to boarding the ferry.
• Name and contact information of the institute or laboratory that conducted the test
Either a digital or paper copy of the test result may be shown.

Further details can be found here: https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/visiting-the-netherlands-from-abroad/checklist
(Until further notice)
Quarantine requirements
A) Who must quarantine and for how long?

All travellers coming from government designated very high risk areas are subject to a mandatory ten-day quarantine. After five days of quarantine, it is possible to take a test. This can be done by calling the municipal health service (GGD) on 0800 1202 (or +31 850 659 063 if you are calling from a foreign phone). You can also make an appointment online by going to https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/coronavirus-test You can make an appointment by phone in advance, but you will have to wait until day five to make an appointment online. If you obtain a negative test result, you can exit quarantine. The "very high risk" areas list is available here https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/visiting-the-netherlands-from-abroad/self-quarantine/mandatory-quarantine The requirement also applies to vaccinated travellers.

Travellers coming from very high risk areas are also required to fill in a quarantine declaration form. The form must be filled and printed before departure to the Netherlands. The form is available in various languages and can be found here: https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/documents/publications/2021/05/26/quarantine-declaration

Countries not included neither in the very high risk areas list nor in the safe countries list are considered to be high risk areas. Travellers coming from high risk areas are strongly advised to undergo a ten-day quarantine upon arrival in the Netherlands. A list of safe areas is available at: https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/visiting-the-netherlands-from-abroad/eu-list-of-safe-countries

B) Where can this be done?

This can be done at any accommodation. Travel to this location should be by private transportation or taxi.
(Until further notice)
Declarations
If you are travelling by air to the Netherlands, you will need to fill in a health declaration form. Many airlines will share this with passengers at check in. The form is available online at https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/documents/publications/2020/07/07/information-for-passengers-flying-to-and-from-the-netherlands
(Until further notice)
Exemptions
A) Travellers who are exempt from a PCR test result must present a health declaration:

- Aircrew can opt to present the results of a NAAT (PCR) test based on a sample collected no more than 72 hours before arrival in the Netherlands (previously it was 24)
- Transport workers are exempt from the PCR testing requirement but will need to carry out a rapid test. Seafarers possessing a seaman’s record book and who are working are exempt from testing. This does not apply to commercial yachts and leisure vessels. The exemption to the negative rapid test result requirement applies to seafarers on board ferries or passenger ships only if they do not leave the ship or travel to and from it.
- Truck drivers who have been in the UK for less than 48 hours will no longer need to comply with the rapid test requirement.
- People arriving from countries on the EU list of safe countries. This can be found at the following link: https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/visiting-the-netherlands-from-abroad/eu-list-of-safe-countries
- Cross-border commuters, students and school children
- Holders of diplomatic passports, heads of state and members of foreign governments
- Air passengers whose flight does not have the Netherlands as its final destination but which must divert to the Netherlands due to unforeseen circumstances
- Travellers with a declaration from the Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport who are unable to provide a negative test result in connection with the urgent transport of organs, tissues and cells for the purpose of medical treatment
- Travellers who continue to test positive after a COVID-19 infection if they have the following documents: a positive PCR test result or antigen test result of a minimum of two and a maximum of eight weeks old; a positive PCR test result of a maximum of 72 hours old on arrival in the Netherlands. Additionally, they must show a negative pre-departure rapid test result of no more than 24 hours upon boarding or, in the event of a positive result on the rapid test, a doctor's statement that they are no longer contagious from a maximum of 72 hours old when boarding. The statement must be in Dutch, English, German, French, Italian, Portuguese or Spanish. The statement must also contain a logo or hallmark of an institute or doctor.
- Car or motorcycle travellers are exempt from showing a negative PCR test result if they are to be in the Netherlands for less than 12 hours or they were in an orange travel country for less than 12 hours and only made essential stops while in the country.

Further information on the exemptions can be found here: https://www.rijksoverheid.nl/onderwerpen/coronavirus-covid-19/reizen-en-vakantie/verplichte-negatieve-covid-19-testuitslagen/uitzonderingen

B) Exempt from quarantine
Cross border workers and cross-border students are exempt. Transport workers are also exempt.

It is also possible to temporarily leave quarantine for a number of reasons. This includes people who travel to the Netherlands for the purpose of starting or continuing activities or investments in the Netherlands and whose trip makes a significant contribution to the Dutch economy and society.

Additional categories include top-level sport, necessary journalism, necessary research, cultural activities, necessary work in the energy sector, work in diplomacy, military and humanitarian organisations. The full list may be found here: https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/visiting-the-netherlands-from-abroad/self-quarantine/exceptions-mandatory-quarantine

People arriving from countries on the EU list of safe countries do not have to quarantine. This can be found here: https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/visiting-the-netherlands-from-abroad/eu-list-of-safe-countries

Full details are available at: https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/visiting-the-netherlands-from-abroad/self-quarantine/exemptions
(Until further notice)
Transit
Passengers transiting in the Netherlands are not required to undergo testing.

Other scenarios may mean a traveller is required to be tested.
If arriving by air:
- If starting the journey in a safe country and changing planes in a high-risk country without leaving the airport: no test requirement applies. Nevertheless, if the passenger leaves the airport, they are subject to the same requirements as non-transit arrivals.
- If starting the journey in a high-risk country and changing planes in a non-high-risk country: negative test result apply. This must be a PCR test based on a sample collected no more than 72 hours before boarding.
- If starting the journey in a high-risk country and changing planes in the Netherlands: no test requirement applies. A transfer is understood to mean: traveling directly, within a few hours, but no later than one day, without leaving the transfer point.
(Until further notice)
OutboundSummary
• Are there any border restrictions? No
• Are there any exit restrictions? No
• Are there any testing requirements? No
• Are there any quarantine requirements? No
• Are there any vaccine requirements? No
• Is COVID-19-related documentation required? No
• Are there any other restrictions? No
(Until further notice)
While there are no outbound travel restrictions, the authorities are currently advising Dutch citizens to avoid all non-essential travel abroad.

Travel to countries with a low infection rate (green or yellow) is permitted

More information can be found at: https://www.nederlandwereldwijd.nl/reizen/reisadviezen
(until further notice)
Internal / DomesticSummary
• Is a state of emergency in place? No
• Are curfews/lockdowns in place? No
• Can businesses operate? Restricted
• Are there restrictions on internal travel? No
• Are there any testing requirements? No
• Are there any vaccination requirements? No
• Are there any other restrictions in place? Yes
(Ends 30 June 2021)
Internal measures
Face masks are compulsory on public transport and in indoor public spaces for people over 13 years of age.

Restaurants can reopen outdoors from 06.00 to 20.00 under certain conditions. Hotels can remain open.

Outdoor leisure locations as well as cultural activities outdoors and indoors can open.

Indoor and outdoor events are banned, except demonstrations, gatherings and meetings as referred to in the Public Assemblies Act.

Non-essential shops can open between 6.00 and 20.00. The option of collecting their order in person is still in place. A five-foot (one and a half metre) social distancing measure still applies.

People are advised to receive no more than 2 visitors a day at home and visit no more than one other household per day.

Further information can be found here: https://www.government.nl/topics/coronavirus-covid-19/tackling-new-coronavirus-in-the-netherlands
(Ends 30 June 2021)
Planned changes and internal conditionsBeginning 24 June, travellers from Albania, Lebanon, North Macedonia, Serbia, Taiwan, and the United States will be allowed unrestricted entry into the Netherlands
(Ends 24 June 2021)
Summary - Changes to the following measures:
• Border restrictions? No
• Entry restrictions? No
• Testing requirements? No
• Quarantine requirements? No
• Vaccination requirements? No
• Transit restrictions? No
• COVID-19-related documentation required? No
• Internal restrictions? No
• Outbound restrictions? No
• Other restrictions? No
(Until further notice)

23 Jun 2021 (Updated Daily)





Risk Summary

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Please see our:

Medical and Security Alerts for Netherlands

COVID-19 information for Netherlands

Dedicated COVID-19 website

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The Netherlands is a stable and highly developed democracy with few security concerns. However, pickpocketing and bag-snatching can be a problem in the larger cities, especially the capital Amsterdam and Rotterdam (South Holland province), particularly in central and tourist-frequented areas and at Amsterdam Airport Schiphol (AMS). Be cautious of thieves riding bicycles and mopeds. Organised criminal activity is more likely to focus on fixed business interests, not workforce, and is unlikely to pose a direct threat to individuals.

The country is a potential target for Islamist terrorism. Several suspected Islamist militants have been arrested in recent years, and other alleged Islamist plots have been uncovered. The risk of an attack remains comparable to many Western European countries. While environmental protests can target businesses, anti-corporate groups occasionally target international companies; such attacks tend to focus mostly on property and pose only an indirect threat to individuals.

This information is intended as a summary of the travel security environment. However, the risks can change at short notice during a crisis or evolving situation. Please check our travel security alerts to ensure you are informed of the most recent developments.

STANDING TRAVEL ADVICE

Vaccinations For Netherlands
Hepatitis AMany travel health professionals recommend
Read more
Hepatitis BRecommended for health care workers and anyone
Read more
Routine Vaccinations

 
 
 
Disclaimer  Privacy

Travel security advice provided in this report represents the best judgment of AEA International Holdings Pte. Ltd. Medical and health advice provided in this report represents the best judgment of AEA International Holdings Pte. Ltd. Advice in this report does not however provide a warranty of future results nor a guarantee against risk.

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