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Australia

Risk Ratings  
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    LOW MEDICAL RISK for Australia
    LOW TRAVEL RISK for Australia


COVID-19 Impact

COVID-19 virus imageCOVID-19 Impact Rating (Travel): High -

Inbound travel significantly restricted for most travellers.

Only citizens and those who meet certain criteria for exemption  may enter. Mandatory testing and quarantine in designated facilities may apply.

COVID-19 virus imageCOVID-19 Impact Rating (Domestic Operations): Low -

COVID-related precautions and restrictions causing some inconvenience to business operations. Most businesses are operating.

Both essential and non-essential businesses are operating, though outbreaks may impact medical and/or logistic factors  and cause disruption, often at short notice. Pre-existing security risks likely to be exacerbated by COVID-19-related political and socio-economic concerns in the near/medium term, though these disruptions will not affect the stability of the overall security environment. Elective surgery may not be accessible at times and VERY HIGH and HIGH Medical Risk Rated countries will be under pressure. Basic elements of BCPs – such as reduced or staggered staffing, social distancing, limited face to face interaction – may be active, with clear escalation and de-escalation triggers as well as mitigation measures.

RestrictionsInboundBorder restrictions

• Border closures/ restrictions
- All international flights are banned in Hobart
- There is a passenger cap for arrivals in NSW, Queensland and Western Australia of 3010, 1000 and 512 respectively.
- All flights from Papua New Guinea to Cairns have been suspended.
- All charter flights from Papua New Guinea to Australia have been suspended.
- Exemptions are made for medical evacuations and other critical flights. Passenger caps for flights from Port Moresby to Brisbane will be reduced by one quarter.



(Until further notice)
Entry rules
• Inbound travel for local nationals/ residents
- Citizens and permanent residents of Australia may enter without obtaining an individual exemption
• Inbound travel for third country nationals
- All non-resident travellers are banned from entering Australia.
• Inbound travel from areas where virus variants of concern are circulating
- Individuals will only be allowed to travel from India to Australia under the following circumstances, which will be at the discretion of the authorities:
• critical workers providing assistance to Australia’s COVID-19 response
• people travelling in Australia’s national interest
• people travelling due to the death or funeral of a close family member in Australia
• people visiting a close family member who is critically ill
• people escorting an Australian citizen or permanent resident minor back to Australia, where the parents of the child are currently in Australia.
For updates, visit https://covid19.homeaffairs.gov.au/travel-restrictions

• Exemptions
- For more information regarding travel restrictions and exemptions, visit the following website: https://covid19.homeaffairs.gov.au/travel-restrictions
- Travellers who fit in the following categories are allowed to enter Australia without obtaining and individual exemption:
• an immediate family member of an Australian citizen or permanent resident
• a New Zealand citizen usually resident in Australia and their immediate family members
• a person who has been in New Zealand for 14 days or more immediately prior to arrival by air in Australia
• a diplomat accredited to Australia, including their immediate family members (each member of the family unit must hold a valid subclass 995 visa)
• a person transiting Australia for 72 hours or less
• airline crew, maritime crew including marine pilots - a person recruited under the Government approved Seasonal Worker Program or Pacific Labour Scheme
• a person who holds a Business Innovation and Investment (subclass 188) visa.
- Travellers are required to provide evidence of one of the above categories, additional evidence may be requested. Travellers with a temporary visa/ do not yet hold a visa must provide proof of relationship prior to travel to Australia.
- Do not travel until the authorities say that you can.
- An individual exemption is required if travellers are:
• a foreign national travelling at the invitation of the Australian Government or a state or territory government authority for the purpose of assisting in the COVID-19 response
• a foreign national whose entry into Australia would be in the national interest, supported by the Australian Government or a state or territory government authority
• providing critical or specialist medical services, including air ambulance, medical evacuations and delivering critical medical supplies
• a foreign national with critical skills or working in a critical sector in Australia a foreign national sponsored by your employer to work in Australia in an occupation on the Priority Migration Skilled Occupation List (PMSOL)
• military personnel, including those who form part of the Status of Forces Agreement, Commonwealth Armed Forces, Asia Pacific Forces and Status of Armed Forces Agreement
• a person who resides on a vessel that seeks safe port at the closest appointed port for reprovisioning or safety reasons for a limited duration, supported by the relevant State or Territory government where safe haven is sought
• a student completing year 11 and 12, with endorsement from the federal Department of Education, Skills and Employment (DESE) and; support from the relevant Australian State or Territory government health authority and education department. Further information regarding this process can be found at the Department of Education, Skills and Employment website.
• a student in your final two years of study of a medical, dental, nursing or allied health profession university degree, where you have evidence of a confirmed placement in an Australian hospital or medical practice which begins within the next two months. Placements should be for a minimum of 24 hours per week for an average period of 3 months or longer
• travelling for compassionate and compelling reasons
- Travellers should apply for an exemption at least two weeks, but not more than two months, before planned travel. All exemptions can be applied through https://travel-exemptions.homeaffairs.gov.au/tep and https://covid19.homeaffairs.gov.au/coming-australia
- The travel bubble that came into effect on 19 April allow travellers from Australia to enter New Zealand without undergoing mandatory quarantine. More details can be found here: https://covid19.homeaffairs.gov.au/new-zealand-safe-travel-zone and https://www.smartraveller.gov.au/destinations/pacific/new-zealand
- Australian residents are still not allowed to fly to New Zealand under the current international travel ban. Aucklanders can once again travel to Australia without having to quarantine on arrival, after the Australian government declared the city is no longer considered a COVID-19 hot spot. The arrangement is currently only one-way, with passengers returning to New Zealand from Australia still having to complete 14 days of managed isolation on their return.


(Until further notice)
Testing requirements
• Who needs to test? + Type of test and timeframe
- Travellers entering or transiting through Australia are required to present a negative COV ID-19 PCR test taken 72 hours prior to departure
• Exemptions
- Children who are 4 years of age or younger (exemption automatically granted based on age on passport)
- People with a relevant medical condition (who can provide a medical certificate)
- international air crew
- travellers entering Australia on a 'Green Safe Travel Zone' flight
- passengers travelling from countries where no PCR testing available, as determined by the Australian Government
- Travellers from Kiribati, Myanmar, Niue, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tokelau, Tonga, Tuvalu, and Vanuatu are exempt from the PCR pre-departure testing requirement.
- Travellers from Belize, Cook Islands, Micronesia, Fiji, French Polynesia, Marshall Islands, Nauru, New Caledonia, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Timor-Leste, and Wallis and Futuna may present a COVID-19 PCR test within 96 hours of departure instead of 72 hours.


(Until further notice)
Quarantine requirements
• Who must quarantine and for how long?
- All travellers arriving in Australia, including Australian citizens, must quarantine for 14 days at a designated facility, such as a hotel in their port of arrival. Travellers may be required to pay for the costs of your quarantine. To find out more about quarantine requirements, contact the relevant state or territory government health department. https://www.health.gov.au/about-us/contact-us/local-state-and-territory-health-departments

• Exemptions
- Only the following travellers can apply for a quarantine exemption. However, as mandatory quarantine is managed by state and territory governments, other requirements may apply depending on the state or territory you arrive in.
- Green travel zone. People in New Zealand for 14 days prior to travel will be from a green zone. Travellers do not need to complete a 14 day mandatory quarantine if they travelled on a green zone flight, and have been in New Zealand for 14 days prior to travel.
o Travellers arriving in Australia should check local requirements prior to any domestic travel. Certain states and territories may still require travellers from a green zone to quarantine, or to be tested, on arrival.
o Travellers will have to complete the Australia Travel Declaration.
o They must not have any signs or symptoms of COVID-19, or been in contact with a confirmed case.
o They must provide contact details while in Australia to help with contact tracing if required.
o Travellers in the green zone may go through additional health screening either before boarding their flight in New Zealand or on arrival in Australia.
o Travellers in the green safe travel zone will not be in contact with passengers from any other countries when transiting the airport.
- Unaccompanied minors may be allowed to travel within Australia after arrival to quarantine with a parent or guardian, unless otherwise specified by the relevant state or territory. For further information, please contact your state or territory government health department.
- Official government travel - Government officials, and/or their dependents, who are returning from official government travel need to quarantine for 14 days on return to Australia. They may quarantine at their home, usual place of residence or private accommodation. Government officials must travel on a government-issued official or diplomatic passport when completing official travel. Government officials are not allowed to take a domestic connecting flight within 14 days of arrival in Australia. Government officials must comply with all state or territory public health requirements. For further information, contact your Australian Government agency employer.
- Foreign diplomats need to quarantine for 14 days on return to Australia. They can quarantine at their mission or usual place of residence. Australia has legal obligations under the Vienna Convention to ensure diplomats’ freedom of movement and travel, and protection from detention.
- Compassionate or medical grounds - Submit applications for a quarantine exemption on medical or compassionate grounds to the relevant state or territory, which will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

(Until further notice)
Documentation required
• Travellers entering and transiting through Australia are required to complete a Travel Declaration at least 72 hours prior to departure.
• Exemptions include: flight crew, foreign diplomats and people travelling on military flights.
• The travel declaration form can be found here: https://covid19.homeaffairs.gov.au/australia-travel-declaration.
(until further notice)
Transit
• New Zealanders, citizens of Pacific Island Forum countries, Timor-Leste citizens and residents of New Caledonia or French Polynesia transiting through Australia on their way to New Zealand or a Pacific Island Forum Country do not require a transit exemption if they have booked a connecting flight to depart Australia within 72 hours of their arriving flight. The outbound connecting flight must depart from the same state or territory of Australia as the arrival flight. If the connecting flight requires the traveller to spend longer than 72 hours in Australia, they are not considered to be transiting and will need to apply online to the Commissioner of the ABF for an exemption from the travel restrictions.
• All other passengers will need to seek an exemption to be allowed to transit through Australia.
• International transit passengers arriving into Australia can leave on another international flight that leaves from the city you arrived in. You must: -
- International transit passengers are required to stay at the airport if next flight is within eight hours
- Go to mandatory quarantine at a state designated facility if the wait for your next flight is eight to 72 hours.
• Transit passengers cannot travel within Australia, even to meet a departing international flight in another city.

(until further notice)
Summary
• Are there any border restrictions? Yes
• Are there any entry restrictions? Yes
• Are there any testing requirements? Yes
• Are there any quarantine requirements? Yes
• Are there any vaccine requirements? No
• Are there any separate transit restrictions? Yes
• Is COVID-19-related documentation required? Yes
• Are there separate restrictions for overseas territories? No
• Are there any other restrictions? No

(Until further notice)
OutboundExit Rules
• Outbound travel for local nationals/ residents
- Permanent residents and Australian citizens may not leave Australia
- Australia has placed stringent exit restrictions to travellers going to Papua New Guinea. Only critical aid workers and critical safety workers may go. There are no exemptions to this restriction.
• Outbound travel for third country nationals
- Non-citizens may return to their home countries. Temporary visa holders do not need any exemption to return to their home country. However, they are unlikely to be allowed to return to Australia. Those seeking to return must seek an inwards exemption before leaving Australia, which are generally granted for compassionate reasons such as attending a funeral.
• Exemption
- Business travel is included in the list of exemptions, but exemption approval remains at the discretion of the local authorities. Further information, including those who are automatically exempt, can be found here: https://covid19.homeaffairs.gov.au/leaving-australia


(until further notice)
Exit Rules
• Outbound travel for local nationals/ residents
- Permanent residents and Australian citizens may not leave Australia
- Australia has placed stringent exit restrictions to travellers going to Papua New Guinea. Only critical aid workers and critical safety workers may go. There are no exemptions to this restriction.
• Outbound travel for third country nationals
- Non-citizens may return to their home countries. Temporary visa holders do not need any exemption to return to their home country. However, they are unlikely to be allowed to return to Australia. Those seeking to return must seek an inwards exemption before leaving Australia, which are generally granted for compassionate reasons such as attending a funeral.
• Exemption
- Business travel is included in the list of exemptions, but exemption approval remains at the discretion of the local authorities. Further information, including those who are automatically exempt, can be found here: https://covid19.homeaffairs.gov.au/leaving-australia


(Until further notice)
Summary
• Are there any border restrictions? No
• Are there any exit restrictions? Yes
• Are there any testing requirements? No
• Are there any quarantine requirements? No
• Are there any vaccine requirements? No
• Are there any separate transit restrictions? No
• Is COVID-19-related documentation required? Yes
• Are there separate restrictions for overseas territories? No
• Are there any other restrictions? No
(Until further notice)
Internal / DomesticState of emergency

• Tasmania
- The Director of Public Health has declared a Public Health Emergency for Tasmania to help manage the threat of COVID-19.
- This declaration provides the Director with emergency powers to implement public health measures to help slow the spread of COVID-19 in Tasmania.
- More information on the directions can be found here: https://coronavirus.tas.gov.au/resources

• Victoria
- A state of emergency remains in force until 1 July.

• Norfolk Island
- A state of emergency remains in force on Norfolk Island until 30 June.

(Until further notice)
Restrictions on internal travel

• What restrictions are in place
• Victoria
- All travellers are required to apply for a Victoria travel permit before being allowed entry. This can be found here: https://www.service.vic.gov.au/services/border-permit/home
Areas across Australia have been classified as 'green', 'orange' and 'red' zones and the permit will vary based on these risk zones.
- Those from red zones will not be allowed to enter Victoria unless they receive an exemption. Those from orange zones will be required to self-quarantine until they receive a negative COVID-19 test result taken within 72 hours of arrival.
- Further information can be found here: https://www.coronavirus.vic.gov.au/victorian-travel-permit-system
• Queensland
- Those who have been to areas declared COVID-19 hot spots in the past 14 days will not be allowed entry unless for essential purposes. Those permitted to enter are required to complete a 14-day quarantine at a government-arranged accommodation. People in Queensland who have been to any of the declared exposure sites must quarantine for 14 days in a government-arranged facility immediately. Permitted travellers are required to complete a Queensland Border Declaration Pass up to three business days prior to arrival into Queensland. The current hot spots are available here: https://www.qld.gov.au/health/conditions/health-alerts/coronavirus-covid-19/current-status/contact-tracing
- From 19 June, all interstate travellers (not applicable to those from declared COVID-19 hot spots above) to Queensland are required to complete a Queensland Travel Declaration up to three days prior to arrival.
- For more information visit: https://www.qld.gov.au/health/conditions/health-alerts/coronavirus-covid-19/current-status/public-health-directions/border-restrictions
• New South Wales
- Travellers permitted to enter NSW from Victoria under the Victorian Health Orders, with the exception of those in the defined border region, must complete a travel declaration that confirms they have not attended a venue of concern. More information can be found here: https://www.health.nsw.gov.au/news/Pages/20210610_01.aspx
- Restrictions are in place for interstate travellers coming from COVID-19 'affected areas' or places under a 'COVID-19 concerns notice'. Current details can be found here: https://www.nsw.gov.au/covid-19/rules/interstate-hotspots
• South Australia
- Travellers intending to enter the state must complete a Cross Border Travel Registration at least 14 days before embarking on the journey. Those without an approval are advised against travelling to the state. Registration link: https://forms.police.sa.gov.au/Runtime/Runtime/Form/CrossBorderTravel
- Restrictions are in place for people who have been to nominated restricted zones. For the latest details, see: https://www.covid-19.sa.gov.au/restrictions-and-responsibilities/travel-restrictions
• Western Australia
- Interstate travel requirements depend on the risk level of the state/territory of departure. Travellers from medium-risk states will not be allowed entry without an exemption through the G2G pass. Those from medium- or low-risk states will need to self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival and may be subject to a COVID-19 test within 48 hours of arrival. Those from very low-risk states do not need to quarantine. All travellers must complete a mandatory G2G pass registration and declaration.
- For the latest risk classification of each state, please see: https://www.wa.gov.au/organisation/covid-communications/covid-19-coronavirus-controlled-interstate-border
- People who have been to areas of concern may be required to quarantine. For the latest updates, see: https://www.wa.gov.au/organisation/department-of-the-premier-and-cabinet/covid-19-coronavirus-latest-updates
• Tasmania
- All travellers, including residents, are required to apply for a G2G Pass (Good to Go) online (those who have travel history to a medium or high risk area) or Tas e-Travel (those who have travel history to a low-risk area) prior to arrival.
- Areas are assessed as either low, medium or high-risk dependent upon the number of COVID-19 cases or level of community transmission in those areas, and subject to Public Health advice. Restrictions are in place for people who have been to medium- or high-risk areas. For the list of locations and further details, see: https://coronavirus.tas.gov.au/travellers-and-visitors/coming-to-tasmania and see: https://coronavirus.tas.gov.au/travellers-and-visitors/coming-to-tasmania/travel-alert
• Australia Capital Territory
- Restrictions are in place for those who have been to a 'COVID-19 place of concern'. The latest locations and restrictions can be found here: https://www.covid19.act.gov.au/updates/covid-19-areas-of-concern
• Northern Territory
- All arrivals to the Northern Territory must:
- Fill in a Border Entry Form https://forms.nt.gov.au/Produce/wizard/9ffc58df-b0a5-422e-86e5-f260522c072a/?prepared=true&logGuid=469f94d8-2edd-4bc4-afb3-46acaa10a477 no more than 72 hours before arrival. A physical form has to be presented upon arrival.
- Complete 14 days of mandatory, supervised quarantine at the travellers' own expense if they have recently been in a declared COVID-19 hot spot (https://coronavirus.nt.gov.au/travel/quarantine/hotspots-covid-19).
- Exemptions from quarantine requirements will be made for a few categories, including health practitioners, transport services and flight crews. These travellers are required to apply for the exemption online https://forms.nt.gov.au/Produce/wizard/570088df-2159-428a-b1d3-b49003827667/?prepared=true&logGuid=f14b391e-9331-423f-82ab-0867b9d6390a
- Anyone who has been to a COVID-19 hot spot must quarantine. The latest details are available here: https://coronavirus.nt.gov.au/travel/quarantine/hotspots-covid-19
- All who enter Northern Territory that have left quarantine in another state are to get a COVID-19 test on day 17 after their quarantine period started. The traveller must also declare on their NT border entry form if they have been in quarantine in another jurisdiction in the past 28 days before entering Northern Territory.
- In addition, anyone entering Northern Territory (whether or not they are required to quarantine) must get a COVID-19 test if required to, at any time during the 28 days after entry. Refusal to do so will result in ten days of quarantine, while those already in quarantine will receive a ten-day extension to their quarantine period. Further details can be found here: https://coronavirus.nt.gov.au/updates/items/2021-06-05-cho-direction-day-17-quarantine-testing-requirement


• Norfolk Island
- All incoming travellers are required to apply for a Norfolk Island Travel Pass. More information can be found here:
https://norfolkau.viewpointcloud.com/categories/1083/record-types/6435
http://www.norfolkisland.gov.nf/covid-19-travel-information-and-entry-pass
- Currently, only Australian and New Zealand citizens are allowed to enter without quarantine if they have not previously travelled from any COVID-19 hot spots.
- More information can be found here:
https://www.norfolkisland.com.au/covid-19
http://www.norfolkisland.gov.nf/covid-19-advice-norfolk-island


(Ends 19 June 2021)
Other social distancing measures
• General
• Victoria
- Face masks are mandatory indoors, and outdoors where you cannot maintain a five-foot (1.5-metre) distance from others.
- If you have any symptoms, no matter how mild, you must get tested for COVID-19.
- For more information, visit https://www.coronavirus.vic.gov.au/coronavirus-covidsafe-settings
- From 23.59 on 17 June, internal measures in Victoria will be eased. The 15 miles (25km) travel limit will be removed and travel between Melbourne and regional Victoria will be allowed.
- Up to two visitors will be allowed daily in metro Melbourne and up to five people in regional Victoria.
- Public gatherings of up to 20 will be allowed in Melbourne, while up to 50 will be allowed in regional Victoria.
- For more information, visit https://www.premier.vic.gov.au/statement-acting-premier-4

• Australian Capital Territory
- There is no limit on household visitors. All businesses and venues can have 25 people across the entire venue. For further details, see: https://www.covid19.act.gov.au/what-you-can-do/what-you-can-do

• Western Australia
- A 30-person limit is in effect for private indoor and outdoor gatherings. Outdoor gatherings of up to 500 people can take place without a COVID-19 event plan. Details of restrictions can be found here: https://www.wa.gov.au/organisation/department-of-the-premier-and-cabinet/covid-19-coronavirus-what-you-can-and-cant-do

• Tasmania
- Gatherings of up to 250 people are allowed in public indoor areas and 1,000 people in outdoor premises. Most businesses, entertainment venues and sporting venues are permitted to reopen. Social distancing rules remain in place.
- Household gatherings of up to 100 people are permitted. Dancing will be permitted by up to 100 people at indoor venues and 250 people in outdoor venues.
- For further details, see: https://coronavirus.tas.gov.au/families-community/current-restrictions

• South Australia
Caps on weddings, funerals and private gatherings have been raised to 200 people, while home gatherings can have up to 50 people. Restrictions on gyms are reduced to one person per 21 square feet (two square metres). Additional details can be found here: https://www.covid-19.sa.gov.au/response

• New South Wales
Masks are mandatory on public transport in Sydney until at least 23 June.
(Ends 23 June 2021)
Summary
• Is a state of emergency in place? Yes
• Are curfews/lockdowns in place? No
• Can businesses operate? Yes
• Are there other restrictions on internal travel? Yes
• Are there any testing requirements? No
• Are there any vaccination requirements? No
• Are there any other restrictions in place? Yes
(Until further notice)
Planned changes and internal conditionsThe authorities on 14 March 2021 announced that both Australia and Singapore are considering a travel bubble from July that would allow residents to travel between both countries without the need to quarantine. Further details can be expected in the coming weeks.
(Until further notice)

19 Jun 2021 (Updated Daily)





Risk Summary

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Please see our:

Medical and Security Alerts for Australia

COVID-19 information for Australia

Dedicated COVID-19 website

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Australia is a safe travel destination. Foreign visitors or assignees are unlikely to encounter any security problems in the country. Crime rates remain low, though petty crime can be an issue in busy tourist areas and entertainment districts.

Australia's pro-US foreign policy and involvement in the US-led military operations in Afghanistan, Iraq and Syria have made the country an attractive target for transnational Islamist terrorist groups. However, the Federal and State authorities are highly capable and have repeatedly disrupted alleged terrorist plots before they have progressed beyond the planning stages. Far-right protests and violence has started to increase.

Tropical cyclones can occur between November and April in tropical regions of the country. Bushfires generally occur between October and March and cause fatalities and substantial property damage in rural and peri-urban areas.

This information is intended as a summary of the security environment; however, the risks can change at short notice during a crisis or evolving situation. Please check our security alerts to ensure you are informed of the most recent developments.

STANDING TRAVEL ADVICE

Vaccinations For Australia
Hepatitis AMany travel health professionals recommend
Read more
Hepatitis BRecommended for health care workers and anyone
Read more
Japanese encephalitisVaccination is recommended for travel to the
Read more
Yellow feverA yellow fever vaccination certificate is
Read more
Routine Vaccinations

 
 
 
Disclaimer  Privacy

Travel security advice provided in this report represents the best judgment of AEA International Holdings Pte. Ltd. Medical and health advice provided in this report represents the best judgment of AEA International Holdings Pte. Ltd. Advice in this report does not however provide a warranty of future results nor a guarantee against risk.

© 2021 AEA International Holdings Pte. Ltd. All rights reserved. Reproduction (other than for authorised internal purposes) is prohibited except with the prior written consent of the copyright owners.